insurance

Cali Approves Sky-High Rate Increases for Individual Health Plans

State insurance regulators largely approved the high rate increases for individual health plans for 2017, accepting the insurers’ argument that they were needed to stop the losses felt since the launch of the Affordable Care Act. Meanwhile, Moda Health will be offering health plans in most of the counties after all, ensuring rural consumers have adequate competition. The state believes the troubled company is now doing well enough and should have its probation lifted soon.

Insurance Commissioner Laura Cali decided to largely sign off on the giant rate increases for 2017 that Oregon insurers have proposed for the individual health insurance market, meaning all consumers rates will go up at least 10 percent from 2016, and some nearly a third.

Losses mount at Oregon health insurers

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State’s nine largest insurers report losses of $105.97 million during first six months of 2015, as membership levels generally hold steady

This is shaping up to be a financially brutal year for Oregon’s major health insurance companies. Since Jan. 1, the nine-largest traditional insurers in the state have reported cumulative losses of $105.97 million.

Small Employers Could Face Higher Costs Under Legislation Proposed by Insurance Division

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Last-minute Senate amendments to HB 2466 will allow Oregon to delay the expansion of the small group market if allowed by the federal government and let insurance companies continue to sell old health plans to employers with 50 to 100 employees. Health Republic CEO Dawn Bonder warned HB 2466 will result in increased rates in 2016 for all small employers. Those who want the old plans will be at the mercy of their insurance company while rates on the existing small group market will be jacked up by a riskier health pool caused by the loss of a healthier workforce to those old plans.

Oregon’s health co-operatives raised alarms about a last-minute bill from the Insurance Division that they contend will stack the deck in favor of the big insurance companies by allowing them wide berth to offer employers old, pre-Obamacare health plans until October 2016, even as most employers

Advocates Maneuver Baby Boomers through Medicare

Local Medicare expert reaches out to aging population

With about 71 million Americans expected to be on Medicare and Medicaid by 2029, the need for those entering or already on federal health programs is stronger than ever, local health advocates say.

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