charity care

Patients Eligible For Charity Care Instead Get Big Bills

When Ashley Pintos went to the emergency room of St. Joseph Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington in 2016, with a sharp pain in her abdomen and no insurance, a representative demanded a $500 deposit before treating her.

Oregon To Lead Nation In Setting Minimum Amount For Hospital Charity Care

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SALEM – Oregon's hospitals have long been required to provide free or discounted care for low-income patients under state and federal charity care laws.

Charity Care Bill Faces Vote

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Hollie Murphy had a hysterectomy in 2013 that threw her into financial turmoil.

She had health insurance. She was a certified nursing assistant at Springfield’s PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. But it was a high deductible plan, and she only made $15 an hour.

Union Seeks Crackdown On Hospital Charity Care, Staffing

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Most of Oregon’s hospitals are nonprofits. They get a break on state and local taxes and in exchange, they’re supposed to provide free or discounted care to those who can’t afford it.

But charity care has decreased in recent years while hospital profits have increased.

Uncompensated Care at Oregon hospitals Reached $9.4 Billion From 2005-2013

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The Lund Report conducted an extensive evaluation of all hospitals in the state, analyzing their charity care, bad debt and uncompensated care for each of the nine years, and also compared their overall uncompensated care with total revenue during the same time period.

The explosion of newcomers gaining health insurance since June 2013 will undoubtedly have a significant impact on the amount of charity care and bad debt at Oregon’s hospitals.

For-Profit Hospitals Skimp on Charity Care

The Lund Report
Overall, spending on care for the poor dropped statewide while enrollment climbed in the Oregon Health Plan

 

April 26, 2013 – Oregon's two for-profit hospitals are among the stingiest hospitals in the state when it comes to providing care for the poor.

After Slipping Through the Cracks, Beaverton Man to Receive Lifesaving Surgery

The Lund Report
Mike Trethewey applied for assistance for dozens of organizations before being accepted for cancer treatment at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle

February 25, 2012 – Mike Trethewey is preparing to travel from Beaverton to Seattle for a life-saving surgery he needed three months ago.

Trethewey was diagnosed last August with stage two metastatic testicular cancer and had three rounds of chemotherapy before he and his wife, Laura, who had Kaiser insurance became uninsured because they were unable to pay the monthly premium.

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