hiv

OHSU Achieves Breakthrough On Malaria Vaccine

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University announced an initial breakthrough on a vaccine against malaria, which killed nearly 500,000 people worldwide in 2017.

Public Health Raises Concerns over HIV Stigma in Bill to Protect Prison Workers

SB 367 will allow an easier trade of information between physicians when a corrections officer comes into contact with an inmate’s bodily fluid to know if the prisoner carried Hepatitis C or HIV. But a discussion about the risks of HIV and Hep C painted the picture that the prison workers must be quarantined even though their real chance of transmission is low.

The Senate unanimously passed a bill Wednesday designed to protect corrections officers from exposure to HIV or Hepatitis C, but discussion around the bill may have sensationalized the risk of acquiring these diseases.

Pendleton Senator Wants HIV Information Exchange for Prison Guards at Risk

SB 367 allows prison doctors to disclose information about an inmate’s HIV or Hepatitis status if a correctional officer has been exposed to bodily fluids. A separate bill requires health insurers to continue coverage for children booked in juvenile hall.

Sen. Bill Hansell, R-Pendleton, has introduced two bills that are designed to improve public policy at the intersection of healthcare and corrections, allowing the physicians of prison guards to get information about HIV exposure and closing a loophole to require health insurers to cover medical costs for juveniles held on bail.

HIV Drugs Skyrocket for Consumers on Some Individual Health Plans

Advocates are proposing legislation that would limit out-of-pocket costs to $150 a month after some patients see insurance companies shift the cost for pricey HIV medications by as much as $1,200 a month, after paying just $40 a month under the old high-risk pool.

Last year, if a person with HIV was insured through the high-risk Oregon Medical Insurance Pool, he or she would chip in $40 a month to help cover the cost of medications.

Mental Health Carve Out Bill Faced Governor’s Veto

The Lund Report
The bill would have required the state to pay for drugs that treat mental illnesses, HIV/AIDS, cancer and immunosuppressant disorders

March 12, 2012—A bill that would have required the state to continue paying for drugs used for mental illnesses, HIV/AIDS, cancer, and immunosuppressant drugs until 2016 died in the last days of the Legislature, blocked by the House and facing a veto threat from Governor Kitzhaber.

Stakeholders Criticize Ban on Federal Funding for Syringe Exchange Programs

The Lund Report
Most programs won't see a significant financial impact, but see the move as a step backward for public health

January 24, 2012 -- Syringe exchange programs are unlikely to suffer major financial impact as a result of a Congressional vote in December that halted federal funding.  

“It's actually going to have minimal impact,” said Kathy Oliver, executive director of Outside In, which has been operating a needle exchange since 1989. “It's a giant step backward in terms of public policy.”

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