samaritan health services

Samaritan Health Services invests millions in smaller hospitals

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Two expansions, worth a combined $17.8 million, are underway, while plans are in development to replace two other hospital structures.

This is a time of growth and expansion for the hospitals owned by Samaritan Health Services, which serves the mid-Willamette Valley and central Oregon Coast with clinics and senior living centers in addition to its medical campuses.

A Look Back: Samaritan Health’s Finances Improve as ACA Reduces Charity Care Costs

Financial filings also show a CEO whose total compensation is more than that of his next-best-paid executive

In the final year before Affordable Care Subsidies drastically expanded health insurance enrollment across Oregon, the costs of covering the health needs of the uninsured took a major financial bite for one of the state’s major healthcare providers. But that all began to change last year.

Legacy and Samaritan Health Merger Unlikely in Near Future

In an interview yesterday, Larry Mullins, president of Samaritan Health Services, discussed the latest collaboration with Stanford Health Care and its cancer center.

Late last year, the word on the street pointed to a potential merger between Samaritan Health Services and Legacy Health. Together their 11 hospitals cover a very wide region, including the Portland metropolitan area and the western half of the state.

Samaritan Health in Talks with Hospitals and Physicians to Broaden its Reach

Larry Mullins, CEO and president of Samaritan Health Services, has witnessed dramatic changes and growth since taking the helm 23 years ago. In this candid interview with The Lund Report he talks about future partnerships, the extraordinary growth of Samaritan, the upcoming launch of its commercial health plan and future challenges.

TLR:  What are your thoughts about the future of Oregon’s healthcare system?

Samaritan Health Services Reported Net Loss in 2012

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To read further, please sign up for a premium subscription. You can also read more about standard and premium subscriptions here. Your subscription dollars are tax deductible and support the in-depth stories you appreciate from The Lund Report. If you believe you already are a premium subscriber, you are already logged in, and you are getting this message, please contact [email protected] Thanks!

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During the same time span, the assets of its five hospitals grew by 3.1 percent, reaching $34.8 million.

How well are Oregon’s hospitals meeting local needs? Are they making smart decisions about their money? Today, The Lund Report runs the fourth in a series of stories exploring hospitals across the state.

This project begins with a review of more than 50 hospitals licensed to operate in Oregon. These stories look at profit margins, hospital size and reach, and touch briefly on executive compensation. Part 1 profiled Providence Health System’s eight hospitals. Part 2 examined Legacy Health’s four Oregon hospitals. Part 3 visited with hospitals owned by four small chains: Kaiser, Asante Tuality and Salem Health. Today, we dig in to Samaritan Health Services. Click on the accompanying Excel spreadsheets for a look at the data collected: a breakdown of Samaritan's finances and a list of what Samaritan top brass were paid in 2012.

After examining the details of every Oregon-licensed hospital, The Lund Report will follow up with stories that dive deep into the facts we’ve uncovered. We’ll ask about profits, compensation and the cost of caring for the poor.

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