hospitals

Idaho antitrust case unintentionally highlights information blocking

A new review of documents from that case by the Idaho Statesman newspaper revealed a fine example of what Congress and the Department of Health and Human Services have dubbed “information blocking”.

A year and a half ago, a federal judge invalidated the purchase of Nampa, Idaho-based Saltzer Medical Group by St. Luke’s Health System in nearby Boise, on antitrust grounds.

Hospital Safety Scores Reveal Only 29 Percent of Oregon Hospitals get High Marks

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None of Oregon’s hospitals have gotten straight A’s since 2012, according to the Leapfrog Group analysis, while Bay Area and Samaritan Albany ranked the lowest in the latest ratings, earning D’s.

Just how safe are Oregon’s hospitals? Newly released hospital safety scores that evaluate hos-pitals across the country show that only 29 percent of Oregon hospitals graded by the non-profit Leapfrog Group received high marks.

Charity Care Spending Falls by Half at Providence Hospitals

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Preliminary 2014 figures suggest CCO enrollments leave fewer patients unable to pay; meanwhile, tax filings reveal millions in compensation for nonprofit’s executives

How is healthcare reform helping – or hurting – the financial bottom line at Oregon’s hospitals? Are nonprofit healthcare organizations paying reasonable salaries to their top executives, or are the millions of dollars that hospital leaders earn each year unreasonable?

Oregon Hospitals See Increased Charges During First Quarter

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Southern Coos Hospital saw the highest increase followed by Samaritan Pacific Communities, while other hospitals, including Providence Hood River saw their charges decline during the same time period.

Oregon’s hospitals are performing more inpatient surgeries, hosting more outpatient visits, and billing many of millions of dollars more for services than just a year ago - an apparent result of the state’s Medicaid expansion, according to a Lund Report analysis of financial and utilization figur

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