Cascade Health Alliance

CCOs Showing Strong Financials in Second Quarter with One Exception

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With one exception, Oregon’s coordinated care organizations (CCOs) all reported strong profits in recently published second quarter financial reports through June 30, 2015.

CCOs Spend $2.06 Billion and Counting on Healthcare Costs

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In financial reports for January through September 2014, all Oregon coordinated care organizations report profits; FamilyCare realizes the highest profit.

Coordinated care organizations born out of the Affordable Care Act to provide healthcare to Medicaid recipients in Oregon spent $2.06 billion caring for the poor in the first nine months of 2014, according to the most recent available figures filed by the 14 CCOs that have filed standardized fina

Sky Lakes and Cascade – “One and the Same”

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The tenacity with which Sky Lakes Medical Center and Cascade Health Alliance in Klamath Falls have sought to squash competition in Klamath County alarms many independent practitioners.

“The monopolization of healthcare in Klamath County is just tragic,” said Becca Meek, a nurse practitioner and nurse midwife who runs Klamath Women’s Clinic and Birth Center.

Nurse Practitioners Shunned While People Wait for Care

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Spurned by Cascade, independent nurse practitioners want to help solve the primary care backlog in Klamath County. Sky Lakes Medical Center contends that it has added the necessary providers to care for the 50 percent more enrollees who joined last year. This article is the first in a two-part series on healthcare in Klamath County.

There is a long history of animosity and mistrust in Klamath County between independent nurse practitioners and the local coordinated care organization, Cascade Health Alliance, which dates back more than two decades.

Klamath County Still at Odds Over Mental Health

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The Oregon Health Authority has sent in a second mediator to resolve the ongoing issues between county officials and Cascade Health Alliance

December 5, 2012 -- A last-ditch effort is under way in Klamath County to mediate the dispute over mental health services for the nearly 13,000 people on the Oregon Health Plan.

State officials have intervened once again, sending in another mediator, while residents continue circulating petitions, asking the Oregon Health Authority to re-open the bidding process and allow a new coordinated care organization to emerge. But that won’t happen while the mediation process continues, according to Patty Wentz, spokesperson.

Tension Mounts in Klamath County Over CCO

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Cascade Health Alliance, which has been certified as the CCO, cannot move forward because of an impasse with county commissioners over mental health services

November 21, 2012 -- The movement to create coordinated care organizations throughout Oregon is riddled with tension in Klamath County where its commissioners are embroiled in a dispute with Cascade Health Alliance over who should be responsible for mental health services.

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