Courtney Sherwood

Oregon Hospitals See Fewer Patients Able to Pay Full Cost of Care in 2016

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The data reveals an increase in charity care spending that seems to coincide with a decline in Medicaid enrollment last year. But there was wide variation across the state, with some rural hospitals still seeing charity care expenses continue to fall.

More patients struggled to pay their hospital bills in 2016 than the year before, in yet further evidence of a slight retrenchment in Affordable Care Act gains, according to a Lund Report analysis of financial data reported to the state.

Lacking a Contract, Florence Nurses Head to Mediation with PeaceHealth

Nurses at the 21-bed PeaceHealth Peace Harbor Medical Center are seeking higher pay and better security. But negotiations have also revealed frustrations with the Catholic health chain’s approach to administration.

After months of negotiation, the 75 nurses who staff PeaceHealth Peace Harbor Medical Center in coastal Florence still have no union contract with their employer.

Small Hospitals See Operating Profits Fall

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Charity care spending has begun to tick up, cutting into the margins of small rural hospital, echoing a trend seen at larger, urban medial centers.

Small rural hospitals that often act as vital lifelines for remote communities across Oregon are starting to see profits fall, following several strong years in the aftermath of the Affordable Care Act.

Oregon Seeks to Navigate Labyrinth of Federal Rules in Efforts to Hold Down Medicaid Drug Costs

With U.S. law prohibiting the Oregon Health Authority from negotiating directly with drug makers to lower prices, the state is taking a complex multi-front approach, the authority’s chief medical officer told the Oregon Health Policy Board.

Oregon’s efforts to rein in prescription spending have shown promising early results, despite federal rules that limit drug price negotiations, the Oregon Health Authority’s chief medical officer said Tuesday.

Experts: Oregon Would Lose Funds, Other Changes Less Clear, Under Republican Insurance Overhaul

Speaking in Portland on Wednesday morning, experts from Washington, D.C., and Oregon healthcare leaders spelled out concerns that the American Health Care Act could roll back gains, cost the state heavily

The Republican-backed healthcare overhaul that’s working its way through Congress this week would likely force huge spending cuts and leave thousands of people uninsured in Oregon if it’s approved – but many other changes being pushed in the legislation are unlikely to pass the Senate

After the ACA: Hospitals that Saw Margins Boom, Charity Care Drop Report Slight Reversal in Latest Report

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Though margins are still positive and charity care is far below pre-Affordable Care Act levels, statewide figures for the third quarter of 2016 show that charity care spending is ticking up at hospitals across the state

Operating margins at Oregon’s hospitals are starting to shrink and charity care spending is rising again, several years after expanded Affordable Care Act enrollments gave hospitals in the state a boost to profits, according to a new analysis of third-quarter 2016 financial results across the sta

Oregon Grapples With Republicans’ Federal Healthcare Proposal

Bill released Tuesday by Congressional Republicans would eliminate public health efforts, cut funding for state Medicaid programs, eliminate dollars for in-home care for intellectually and developmentally disabled

As Oregon’s healthcare leaders grapple with their first official look at the Affordable Care Act Republicans in Washington, D.C., have drafted, they are faced with a bill that could force drastic changes to the state’s ongoing efforts to provide insurance coverage to all Oregonians.

Oregon’s Major Health Insurers Shed Tens of Thousands of Members

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As number of people with insurance climbs, the companies that have traditionally enrolled the most people in Oregon see membership decline. Could these health plans be losing clout?

The number of people receiving health insurance through small insurers or buying individual marketplace plans in Oregon dropped significantly in 2016, with 74,422 fewer people covered under the state’s major plans at the end of last year than a year earlier.

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