oregon association of hospitals and health systems

State Wants Hospitals to Report Better ER Data, but Hospitals Resist Mandate

The hospital association argues for voluntary ER data reporting, seeking to avoid a new mandate or fees. But the state says the best way to ensure hospitals report this data -- and to help identify the misuse of emergency rooms for mental patients -- would be a statute.

The Oregon Health Authority wants Oregon hospitals to step up their data reporting to include information on emergency department visits, but the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems is fighting the legislation.

Senate Gives Unanimous Approval to Nurse Staffing Law Changes

The legislation backed by the Oregon Nurses Association gives teeth to the state’s hospital nurse staffing committees, which were set up 10 years ago to set hospital support staff levels based on patient need, but have not always been taken seriously.

The Senate unanimously passed a bill Wednesday that gives teeth to hospital nurse staffing committees, providing a coup for the Oregon Nurses Association, which made Senate Bill 469 its top priority this session

First Quarter Reports Indicate Hospital Margins Continue Their Upswing

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Also, the latest filings by the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems showed that its president and CEO, Andy Davidson, saw his salary decline significantly.

Preliminary data indicates hospitals throughout Oregon saw their operating margins –which measures profitability -- continue their upward swing while charity care dropped to record-level lows, according to first quarter reports obtained by The Lund Report

Legislature Appears Set to Require Certification for Scrub Techs

A group of surgical technologists, or scrub techs, pushed House Bill 2876 to require standards for their profession and close a potential gap in patient safety. They’ve been after education and certification requirements for at least 15 years, and now a law is likely to take effect next year.

It’s been a long time coming, but legislation looks promising that will require Oregon hospitals and clinics to use only certified “scrub techs” or surgical technologists.

Hospital Cost Transparency Faces Legislature Tomorrow

Two bills, sponsored by SEIU Local 49 and the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, could lead to a frank discussion of hospital costs for the very first time.

The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems and SEIU Local 49 go head to head tomorrow in a hearing before the Senate Health Committee on cost transparency.

At issue is what consumers deserve to know about hospital costs, and both sides are armed with strong lobbying power.

Healthcare Groups Put $1.6 Million on Board for Campaigns Since Fall

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The spending by doctors groups, nurses, hospitals, dentists and insurers helps underwrite legislators’ campaigns, as political action committees seek to influence legislation and the state budget in Oregon. Groups that gave less have had considerably less clout in Salem.

Oregon’s leading healthcare organizations spent liberally during the election season and its aftermath, with just 12 groups topping $1.6 million in spending since Sept. 1.

Hospital Association Insists Data about Hospital Inpatient Costs is Misleading

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Andy Davidson, president and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, earned $1.2 million in 2012, considerably lower than his counterpart in Washington state.

An article published by Becker’s Hospital Review – in collaboration with Kaiser Family Foundation – which characterizes Oregon and Washington as having the highest inpatient costs aro

Premium Program Fills Gap in Cover Oregon Affordability

Project Access Now, in partnership with the Portland-area hospitals, is offering a premium assistance program to certain Metro residents who get referred by a clinic or hospital, paying premiums and coinsurance for low-income people who did not qualify for the Medicaid expansion.

For people with modest incomes who haven’t been fortunate enough to receive employer-supported insurance, the Affordable Care Act has been something of a godsend, allowing them to purchase health insurance for the first time without breaking the bank.

Nearly 300,000 people in Oregon are newly enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan, and many more had the chance to buy subsidized health insurance on Cover Oregon for a fraction of the sticker price.

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