Chris Gray and Jen Kruse

Drug Companies Spend $314K on Campaigns, a Third from Eli Lilly

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The drug companies were back in 2014 for another round aimed at influencing public policy, directing money most squarely at the Democratic leadership in the Legislature, but not the governor, who aims to give more authority to CCOs to rein in the purchase of high-cost brand name pharmaceuticals. This story is part three in a three-part series on healthcare-related Oregon state campaign finance contributions.

Pharmaceutical companies have spent $314,000 on Oregon political campaigns since the start of 2014, and they are aiming their dollars at the Demo

Courtney Leads Legislators in Tobacco Campaign Cash

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Despite a voting record that has not been friendly to tobacco companies, Senate President Peter Courtney once again raised a sizable pot of cash from the parent company of Philip Morris. His support will be critical to a series of bills designed to reduce smoking and better regulate the sale of cigarettes. This story is part two in a three-part series on healthcare-related Oregon state campaign finance contributions.

Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, took in more money from tobacco companies in 2014 than any other Oregon politician, raking in $10,000 from Altria Client Services, the parent company of Philip Morris, which manufactures of Marlboro cigarettes.

Healthcare Groups Put $1.6 Million on Board for Campaigns Since Fall

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The spending by doctors groups, nurses, hospitals, dentists and insurers helps underwrite legislators’ campaigns, as political action committees seek to influence legislation and the state budget in Oregon. Groups that gave less have had considerably less clout in Salem.

Oregon’s leading healthcare organizations spent liberally during the election season and its aftermath, with just 12 groups topping $1.6 million in spending since Sept. 1.

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